| LIFE Pictures of the day -- From the wild to the crazy to the beautiful.

Bamabww

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Since health issue in our family plus the covid-19 stuff have severely limited our traveling, I've been studying a little about the native American's customs, mostly Cherokee, who shared our Bankhead Forest with a few other tribes. I had collected a large album of pictures from our hikes there over the past several years of trees that looked unnatural. A lot of those trees are actually burial markers according to some of the "experts" in that stuff. This one is a "Healing tree" and used by the Indians because of the positive energy in the area. I can't explain it but we both felt a sense of calmness, for lack of a better word, around this tree. I'll share a few of the photos of trees we've found if there is any interest in this sort of thing.
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Bamabww

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One of the most visited of all marker trees, this one is in Indian Tomb Hollow, maybe 8 miles from my house. Some think it is a boundary marker others a grave marker. Sadly, this one didn't put out any leaves this year.

A lot more info about the hollow is found at Indian Tomb Hollow

This was the site of a battle over 200 years ago between the Creek and Chickasaw tribes. According to legend, the survivors of the losing side were thrown down a sinkhole in the canyon, which became the “tomb” which is part of the name of the place: “Indian Tomb Hollow”. This area is still a sacred place to Native Americans. The very unusual “goalpost” shaped tree was formed by the tribes to mark the border of the two tribes’ territories after the bloody battle, according to one source.
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