| NEWS NCAA releases new guidelines on NIL (involvement with boosters highlighted.)

SoCalPatrick

Thread Starter
Sideline Club
SCOTTSDALE Ariz.—College leaders are gearing up to issue a warning to hundreds of wealthy boosters who are using name, image and likeness (NIL) ventures to involve themselves in recruiting.

University administrators, part of a task force to review NIL, are finalizing additional guidelines that are expected to clarify that boosters and booster-led collectives are prohibited from involvement in recruiting, multiple sources tell Sports Illustrated. The guidelines will provide more guidance to member schools on what many administrators say are NIL-disguised “pay for play” deals orchestrated by donors to induce prospects, recruit players off other college teams and retain their own athletes.

The new directives will highlight existing NCAA bylaws that outlaw boosters from participating in recruiting, reminding member schools of guardrails that, while in place for years, have been bent and broken during the first 10 months of the NIL era, officials say. Under a long-held NCAA rule, boosters are a representative arm of an athletic department and are not supposed to associate with or persuade prospects.

The guidelines, still in draft form, outline that booster-backed collectives should be prohibited from associating with high school prospects and college transfers, potentially opening the door for contentious legal challenges between the association and booster groups.

Schools that do not control their donors’ spending could be found to have violated NCAA rules and will be punished, according to the document. The NCAA enforcement staff have made inquiries only into a small handful of programs so far, but the guidelines could spark deeper investigations into improper inducements tied to NIL payments.

“We let things get out of hand,” says one official with knowledge of the guidelines. “We have to get [the boosters] out of contacting recruits and bartering with them.”

A new NCAA working group tasked with reviewing NIL spent the past month creating the multipage document of guidelines, an addendum to the organization’s interim NIL policy released last summer. The guidelines are being rushed through the NCAA governance system and could be approved within a week’s time, sources say. They are expected to be the first of what could be ongoing clarity from leadership about the new and complicated space.

The draft of guidelines is being circulated this week in Phoenix, where more than 200 administrators and coaches from at least four conferences hold their annual spring meetings. The administrative council of the NCAA Board of Directors meets Monday, at which point they can rubber stamp the draft.

In a seminal chapter in a seismic moment for college sports, the recommendations and potential subsequent investigations could have sweeping impacts on the current landscape, where individual donors (directives) and groups of donors (collectives) have been communicating with prospects or their agents to arrange NIL deals. Sports Illustrated spoke to more than two dozen college sports stakeholders over the past six months for a wide-ranging story that revealed the unregulated, high-priced bidding wars for college football and men’s basketball players.

 

Crtuneman

Sideline Club
This sounds great at first glance, but then you realize that any violations will be investigated and punished by the NCAA, which means long drawn out investigations and inequitable, nonsensical punishments. I think this falls into the category of much sound and fury, signifying nothing.
 

UAgrad93

Jack of all trades!!
Crimson Tide Club
This has got to be reeled in! Set some guidelines and sanctions and give a date to get your affairs in order then face consequences if you fail to comply.
 

bama alum

Scholarship Club
“We let things get out of hand,” says one official with knowledge of the guidelines. “We have to get [the boosters] out of contacting recruits and bartering with them.”

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TerryP

Misomaniac
Ivory Club
Why do people in power always feel the need to get the government involved? It always makes things worse. This is not the job of the federal government. This will make it more corrupt, not less. One of the most frightening phrases in the English language is, "I'm from the government and I'm here to help." Ugh.
The "each state makes its own laws regarding NIL" certainly has worked for the best. 🙃 While I haven't researched it a tweet from Finebaum suggested CA has a "pay for play" bill running through their legislature right now.

Honestly, it may require national legislation to reign this in. I don't like the idea, at all. But it is what it is at this stage.

Burying the lede:

Did you notice how the PAC commish mentions a smaller group to oversee these schools and NIL deals? That, to me, sounds like we're one step closer to the P5 schools breaking away from the NCAA.
 

Davestwin

Sideline Club
The "each state makes its own laws regarding NIL" certainly has worked for the best. While I haven't researched it a tweet from Finebaum suggested CA has a "pay for play" bill running through their legislature right now.

Honestly, it may require national legislation to reign this in. I don't like the idea, at all. But it is what it is at this stage.

Burying the lede:

Did you notice how the PAC commish mentions a smaller group to oversee these schools and NIL deals? That, to me, sounds like we're one step closer to the P5 schools breaking away from the NCAA.
The P5 schools will break away … it’s inevitable. They will have a commissioner and many rules similar to the NFL. And that’s appropriate as major college football will become a high end professional minor league system for the NFL. Players will be paid but with limits at first then you can bet the have nots of the P5 will force some kind of salary cap system to be implemented. The moment Congress and the courts approved and promoted college players being paid the die was cast. College football can never put the genie back in the bottle and that’s a shame. The transfer portal and NIL (even when constrained) will ruin the greatest game in all of sports.
 

BamaFan334

Scholarship Club
I saw Bijon Robinson signed a deal with a local Lamborghini dealership. I'd be willing to bet my house that no one is buying a Lamborghini because they saw a commercial with him in it or that one may come with an autographed football from him. This is simply a pay to stay situation that was never intended to be when all this was instituted. Good for him laughing all the way to the bank, but Lamborghini prides themselves on no marketing as they consider their cars selling themselves and "no one buying a Lamborghini is watching TV", saving commercials.
 

TerryP

Misomaniac
Ivory Club
"Heaven has no rage like love to hatred turned, nor hell a fury like a woman scorned."

Or, how about "Heaven has no rage like love to hatred turned, nor hell a fury like a bureaucrat scorned?" Pressure. That's what I feel the NCAA powers that be are feeling right now due to how the NIL has been abused.

Danny Kanell offered a Twitter poll this week asking how many were happy with the way the NIL and transfers have affected college football. Over 78% said "no." Josh Pate had a similar poll, same medium, where just under 73% said they didn't like where the sport was headed. Eight of ten? That's where your pressure is coming from from my point of view: fan displeasure at the core. Look no further than the constant media coverage and the meetings in DC*** for more evidence.

I suspect A&M is scrambling right now trying to "hide" what's transpired in College Station. Hiding what, you might ask. One rule that hasn't changed; boosters can't have contact with recruits. While some of these numbers (dollar amounts) have been exaggerated (see Tennessee and their QB) some of these "offers" haven't been: like 800K to an Aggie in this last class.

Here's A&M's problem. Kids that signed with their last class shopped their A&M offers against other schools. This hasn't been kept "in house" in spite of Jimbo recently saying "A&M had no idea how much money or who was getting paid." (sic)

I know many will have the reaction, "nothing will happen." I disagree, wholeheartedly. There's too many involved for it to simply get passed by.

*** I've learned we shouldn't just dismiss the involvement of the Feds/DC: there's a strong movement there as well.
 

TerryP

Misomaniac
Ivory Club
I'll believe any repercussions when I see them.
Recently, there were parents of a kid who was getting P5 offers that were "worth" several hundred thousand. These parents called the school and mentioned this asking if they would meet the same numbers.

ALL STOP! Even if we're in the age of the NIL that's asking for payment: also knows as an inducement. That's been against the NCAA rules and regs for a long time. Those penalities, if handed down, would be on the school he was currently enrolled (and they were just matching the number, but were asked to match the number.)

In regard to A&M, several of the players they signed shopped their offers to other schools. Again, there's a case of asking for an inducement to attend. In spite of the NIL, again, it's a long established rule in place.

In that light I can see the NCAA stepping in but penalties, and the fairness of those, will be in question. According to what I've learned the NCAA has said kids won't lose eligibility. But, it's that kid and his family asking for money. Should that fall on the school or the parents?

A&M's situation is one of those Saban was referring to as unsustainable and that's not getting into the NCAA's field of play. The fact that money is coming from boosters to attend, and it's not based on name, image, or likeness, goes against NCAA rules that have long been in play.
I don't know how it'll end up. Gene Smith says "look for lawsuits to be filed." I do know that A&M has been busy covering their tracks the last week or so. Make of that what you will.

Personally, I'm not worried about this. Those players at A&M will be the same players today as they will be two years from now. Jimbo doesn't develop talent.
 

TerryP

Misomaniac
Ivory Club
Where is the return on investment in all of this?
This is hitting on what @BamaFan334 and I were discussing a few weeks ago. In reality, this is nothing more than an ego stroked here or there. I mentioned what Saban had said about unsustainability in that conversation. If you're kicking in 800K for a defensive linemen and he's not developed into an All-American type you're going to stop spending that money on a kid and spend your money elsewhere.

It's a Pandora's Box in a sense. If your boosters are kicking that kind of cash at your players and you're not winning championships? That money will stop. And, sooner than later it'll be those coaches whose asses are on the line.
 
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