| NEWS NCAA official: 6 schools could face punishment related to basketball investigation- Kansas City Star

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Some schools involved in the FBI’s college basketball investigation were put on alert by an NCAA official Wednesday. Could Kansas be among them?

The official, Stan Wilcox, vice president of regulatory affairs, told CBSSports.com that six schools will receive a Notice of Allegations for Level 1 violations. Two would receive notices in July, the other four later this summer.

The violations were revealed during the FBI investigation that produced 10 arrests, including four assistant coaches, from Auburn, Arizona, USC and Oklahoma State. Some 20 schools were mentioned during the course of the investigation, which in part found that Adidas officials funneled money to the guardians of top basketball recruits to steer them toward college basketball programs sponsored by the apparel company.

Wilcox did not name the schools that will receive a Notice of Allegations, which are delivered after a NCAA investigation is closed.

Officials from the NCAA couldn’t be reached for comment. A Kansas Athletics official said KU would have no comment.

Level 1 violations carry some of the most severe punishment, including postseason bans and scholarship loss.

“So now that’s it over, we’re going to be moving forward with a number of Level I cases that will help people realize that, ‘Yeah, the enforcement staff was in a position to move forward,’” Wilcox told CBSSports.com.

Kansas is among the schools associated with Adidas that were named in the FBI investigation.

Former Adidas employee T.J. Gassnola testified in federal court last October that he made concealed payments on behalf of the company to the families of KU basketball players Billy Preston and Silvio De Sousa. Gassnola also testified that KU coach Bill Self was not aware of the payments.

As a result of that trial, De Sousa was given a two-year NCAA suspension. Kansas appealed the second year of the punishment, and the NCAA reinstated De Sousa last month.

The NCAA was allowed to take information from the trial and apply it to its investigations, but one piece of possible evidence involving Kansas cannot be used by the NCAA.

Emerging from the trial was a wiretap recording of Kansas assistant coach Kurtis Townsend in which it was suggested a financial arrangement was required to land top recruit Zion Williamson.

But the call wasn’t entered into evidence in the trial, and according to Wilcox, the NCAA doesn’t have access to it.

Text messages from Self, Townsend and Gassnola were entered into evidence, however. Those text conversations are from the days leading to De Sousa’s commitment to KU and the announcement of a KU-Adidas contract extension, which was not finalized until this April.
 

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ORLANDO, Fla. -- At least six Division I men's basketball programs will receive notices of allegations for Level I violations from the NCAA by the summer, stemming from the federal government's recently completed investigation of the sport, a top NCAA official told CBS Sports.

Stan Wilcox, NCAA vice president for regulatory affairs, said two high-profile programs would receive notices of allegations by early July.

The remaining four would be rolled out later in the summer in what was described as a wave of NCAA investigations meant to clean up major-college basketball.

"There's even another group of cases that we're still working on," Wilcox said. "The main thing is that we're up and ready. We're moving forward and you'll see consequences."

Level I violations are considered the most serious by the NCAA. They carry the strongest punishments that can include scholarship reductions, postseason bans and show-cause orders against coaches. According to the NCAA, a notice of allegationsis sent after an investigation has closed.

It has previously been reported that at least Kansas, Arizona and Louisville had been under NCAA investigation.

At least 20 schools were mentioned during the course of the FBI's investigation. Among others were Oklahoma State, USC, Auburn and LSU. Wilcox said only those schools involved in eligibility issues would be impacted.

He would not name any of the schools involved.

"I would just say that it's clear when you look at the number of cases that were listed by the Southern District of New York, those numbers are more than likely be reflected in the number of cases that are going to be moving forward," said Wilcox, a former Florida State athletic director and Notre Dame basketball player.

When the original FBI indictments were handed down in September 2017, there were reports that top head coaches would be implicated in wrongdoing.

NCAA rules now make head coaches responsible for wrongdoing within their program.

"Those top coaches that were mentioned in the trials where the information shows what was being said was a violation of NCAA rules, yes. They will be all part of these notices of allegations," Wilcox said.

The NCAA had held off on investigations, he said, at the request of the government until the trials were concluded.

"So now that's it over, we're going to be moving forward with a number of Level I cases that will help people realize that, 'Yeah, the enforcement staff was in a position to move forward,'" Wilcox said.

These new cases will be subject to new NCAA policies adopted through the recommendations made by the Rice Commission, Wilcox said.

Up to five of the most serious cases annually now will be decided by an infractions committee that will now include persons outside of the NCAA. That policy goes into effect Aug. 1.

"They could be more restrictive or less restrictive," Wilcox said. "I wouldn't want to be the first institution to go through that process."
Wilcox was in Orlando on Wednesday as a panelist speaking on NCAA issues at the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics convention.

Part of his duties include overseeing NCAA enforcement.

The FBI announced in September 2017 it had indicted 10 persons -- including four assistant coaches -- on charges of bribery and fraud. The cases wrapped up this year with assistant coaches at Auburn, Arizona, USC and Oklahoma State pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit bribery.

Aspiring agent Christian Dawkins and Adidas consultant Merle Code were found guilty in two separate trials on fraud and bribery charges. Former adidas executive Jim Gatto was found guilty of conspiracy to commit wire fraud against Louisville and Kansas.

In a rare show of candor in such cases, both Wilcox and NCAA vice president of Division I governance Kevin Lennon have spoken out recently about the NCAA's intentions in the FBI cases.

"It's a great opportunity for the enforcement staff, the committee on infractions, as well as our whole community to now try to … put things back where they need to be," Wilcox said.

The federal government's intervention and prosecution of the cases raised questions whether the pay-for-play conduct was even a crime.

They certainly seem to be NCAA violations. The FBI investigation exposed what was long known to be a widespread culture of cheating at least the high levels of college basketball.

In a way, the FBI may have made violation of NCAA rules a federal crime.

"The membership, particularly the coaching community, have been frustrated," Wilcox said. "Those cases started 2017? We're now in '19. They want action."

Lennon told the Knight Commission last month: "You don't get in the way of a federal investigation. Activity was going on during that span that was within our purview, but now that the court cases are done, now we're in a position where you're likely to see notices of allegations going to institutions that have violated NCAA rules."

It is rare for any NCAA official to speak publicly about ongoing investigations. In fact, it is against protocol for officials to speak about a specific ongoing case.

In may be with such proclamations, the NCAA is sending a message that it is serious regarding what is arguably the worst cheating scandal in enforcement history.

The NCAA did change its rules allowing it take information from a trial and apply it to ongoing investigations. Previously, NCAA investigators had to develop information for themselves that had been revealed in court or by media accounts.

"I'm very excited to see that process move around," NCAA President Mark Emmert said during the Final Four in April. "It's finally the case now that we can take and receive information and evidence from other proceedings … and directly import them into our investigatory work."

Earlier this year, the NCAA petitioned the FBI for more information relating to the cases. Wilcox said there was some NCAA frustration in not getting all that information from the trials.

One of the most significant pieces of information to emerge from the trials was a wire tap involving Kansas assistant Kurt Townsend.
On it, Townsend can be heard discussing the exact financial arrangement it would take to land then-No. 1 recruit Zion Williamson. However, that call wasn't entered into evidence in the trial.

"Any wiretap that was introduced into evidence [we can use]," Wilcox said. "It wasn't. That was leaked. We don't have access to that.

"We can use the information that was put in the media but … we would take that information and when we sit down and talk with the coach we would use that as [a talking point]."

Wilcox made a point to say the NCAA had "individuals" in court during the multiple trials "listening to everything that was said."
 

Tidestalker

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Kansas has been cheating their ass off for a while.... I'll enjoy seeing who the others are
 

mando

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Will bama be part of this with Sexton? Sure hope not...
 

12gage

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I'll enjoy seeing who the others are
"I would just say that it's clear when you look at the number of cases that were listed by the Southern District of New York, those numbers are more than likely be reflected in the number of cases that are going to be moving forward," said Wilcox, a former Florida State athletic director and Notre Dame basketball player.
The question is "who is the sixth team?" Auburn, LSU, Kansas, USC and Oklahoma State are the ones referred to here by Wilcox.

Will bama be part of this with Sexton? Sure hope not...
Why would they? They had no part in Sexton's meal. When they found out about it, reported the infraction and subsequently paid it back Colin sat for a game and was reinstated. There wasn't anything linking Alabama and that meal with Colin.
 

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Kansas has been cheating their ass off for a while.... I'll enjoy seeing who the others are
Oh, I'm so sure L8U won't be one of them. After all, Watford dragged out his recruitment til the bitter end to know that even though he's probably one and done that he'll still have that one chance to play in the big dance.

:rolleyes:
 

50+yeartidefan

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The question is "who is the sixth team?" Auburn, LSU, Kansas, USC and Oklahoma State are the ones referred to here by Wilcox.


Why would they? They had no part in Sexton's meal. When they found out about it, reported the infraction and subsequently paid it back Colin sat for a game and was reinstated. There wasn't anything linking Alabama and that meal with Colin.
Didn’t know all that.....thats good news...hate to see a new coach get saddled with restrictions.....
But as for Pearl....his history of violations...may be a different story
 

TUSKtimes

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The question is "who is the sixth team?" Auburn, LSU, Kansas, USC and Oklahoma State are the ones referred to here by Wilcox.

My guess would be Louisville.
 

TerryP

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My guess would be Louisville.
That's mine as well.

It's been an interesting week with FOIA request being submitted to Auburn and them saying "we can't release that info because of an ongoing investigation" when we're also seeing "there is no investigation" from others in Auburn.
 

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@bama alum, a question I have yet to see an answer to ...

There were NCAA officials in the courtroom during these proceedings. They've heard the testimony. Under their bylaws, is hearing testimony in a court of law admissible to the COI?
 

TUSKtimes

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That's mine as well.

It's been an interesting week with FOIA request being submitted to Auburn and them saying "we can't release that info because of an ongoing investigation" when we're also seeing "there is no investigation" from others in Auburn.

Frankly, I haven't heard where Pearl had to testify with the FBI and I don't think he has ever had that talk with his own administration and certainly not the NCAA. I've seen both Pearl and Wade stonewall their superiors and live to tell the tale. Amazing, that wouldn't have happened before Cam Newton.

Maybe with the barn, NC, and Miami beating up on the NCAA when all were guilty over serious transgressions, I kinda think college administrators feel like they have the gameplan to deal with accusations as serious as death and keep surviving. Otherwise, I really can't explain how both Pearl and Wade still have jobs. The NCAA is talking tough. Let's see if they can dig up any skeletons in Wade and Pearl's closet.
 

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@bama alum, a question I have yet to see an answer to ...

There were NCAA officials in the courtroom during these proceedings. They've heard the testimony. Under their bylaws, is hearing testimony in a court of law admissible to the COI?
How could they not be allowed to be present?

I see LSU and Louisville before I see the barn. They know how to skate too well.
 

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How could they not be allowed to be present?

I see LSU and Louisville before I see the barn. They know how to skate too well.
 

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This is the nzaa, @TerryP . I won't be surprised at all if Person's falling on the sword was enough for them.

I would love to be wrong.
 

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This is the nzaa, @TerryP . I won't be surprised at all if Person's falling on the sword was enough for them.

I would love to be wrong.
Pat Forde and Pete Thamel are reporting these teams are in the NCAA's sights:

Louisville,
North Carolina State,
Kansas,
Arizona,
LSU,
USC,
Oklahoma State,
South Carolina,
and Auburn.

TCU, Creighton and Clemson all also had assistant coaches implicated in the scandal and could face sanctions.

I'm reminded of Sankey's comment a few months ago about how this story wasn't over yet.

And, with as much egg as the NCAA has had on its face the last few go-arounds with the COI I suspect they'll be out for blood and when they latch on (like a Pit Bull) they're going to make sure they've got a good bite.
 

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So UNC walks after years of wrong doing and NC State pays for it?
 

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So UNC walks after years of wrong doing and NC State pays for it?
Except for the fact everything UNC did was by the book. The NCAA had no case there.
 

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The barn has to be one I mean come on Pearson is going to jail. I hope LSU is in there as well.
 
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