| LIFE How would you react?

TerryP

Thread Starter
Ivory Club
Yesterday afternoon I stopped at the 7-11 for a couple of drinks. Total, $3.52. I hand the cashier a twenty, he gives me $16 dollars back and says, "I don't have any change." I said, "you can't just keep my money." He then proceeded to slam the drawer shut, then turned his back on me.

I'll tell you how I did react...but I'm curious as to what you guys would have done.

As of this moment, I'm not done yet...been shopping in that store since the day it was opened. Hell, the first week their current manager had over this store I outed a guy I saw stealing cigars: literally, in front of everyone. She went and saw the tape...thanked me the next day.

I know, fifty cents. But damn...my money.
 

Bamabww

Bench Warmer
Scholarship Club
Yeah, what the hell has caused that to be the norm? There are 3 Dollar Generals within 8 miles of my house and each one of them has a sign at the cash register saying, "No change available. Please use a card or pay with paper money only." I asked the attendant at one of them what would have happened if I had paid for my purchase with cash and she said, "If I owed you change back, I would have given you the opportunity to donate your change to a charity Dollar General supports. If you didn't agree to that you'd have the opportunity to return your merchandise and get a full refund."

In your case, after raising hell about it, I'd just ask for my money back and return the drinks if unopened. Then mark that store off my list of future places to shop.
 

TerryP

Thread Starter
Ivory Club
I’d have grabbed a candy bar off the shelf on the way out and told him we should be all square now. See you tomorrow.
Right now, I'm at a case of beer. (As in what it's going to take to keep me from raising hell.)

Of my many "gigs," one of them involves social marketing: multiple platforms. FB's algorithms are easy to manipulate to 'trend' and I'm tempted to be a real ass here.

Here's demented. The ease it would be to have a store, trending on FB neighborhood pages, about how they take steal money from people.

.50 from me.

How many times/customers?

EDIT: I could likely hit 2K views, cost me four bucks, and it's a trending post (promoted.) Ya see how messed up some of this is?
 

rocknthefreeworld

Century Club
There was a change shortage at one point but it should be mostly over now.

On a related note, every time getting rid of the penny comes up I think of situations like this. How easy it would be for stores to position themselves to make more money through setting prices a certain way and keeping that extra few cents in every transaction. Not much for a mom and pop but at a place like WalMart that could be millions a week across the country.
 

footballer

Sideline Club
With the printing presses running wide open these days, how long before the federal reserve note
becomes obsolete? Pennies are basically worthless as it is. The powers that be knew this was coming
some time ago and quit making them from copper. When they were made of copper, they would be worth
more as scrap than as tender. The dollar is not worth the cost of the paper, ink, time to print or inspection.
 

rocknthefreeworld

Century Club
With the printing presses running wide open these days, how long before the federal reserve note
becomes obsolete? Pennies are basically worthless as it is. The powers that be knew this was coming
some time ago and quit making them from copper. When they were made of copper, they would be worth
more as scrap than as tender. The dollar is not worth the cost of the paper, ink, time to print or inspection.

There is actually a prohibition against melting down pennies and nickels. There is not a prohibition against melting down any other coins. I will leave the reader to make a determination as to what that means.

A paper dollar is actually worth a ton to the Treasury. They cost about 6.2 cents in material and labor.
 

footballer

Sideline Club
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
I could be wrong, but I think there have been laws for a very long time against melting or defacing any coinage in any way.
I am not sure what metals are used in the makeup of todays pennies, but left in some mineral water long enough, they will dissolve.
 

XXL TideFan

Seer
Bama Club
Give you an idea of the size of a trillion $. If you were around the day Jesus was born and you had $1T. You could spend a million a day until now and still have more than Bezos and Gates. When QE started our government facilitated the dumping of money by the trillions into the currency supply every quarter since the end of Bush’s second term.
A penny now regardless of its composition is lost money in commodities.

Germs and virii can thrive on coins and paper money. Covid from a $ in change that some “lady” pulled out of her bra or whatever the scenario. Big push is on anyway to a cashless country. The government is shitting it’s collective pants to make our currency crypto before the ChiComs. Makes it easier to control ALL of the money regardless of what account it’s in. Makes it easy to prevent you buying some contraband.
 

rocknthefreeworld

Century Club
I could be wrong, but I think there have been laws for a very long time against melting or defacing any coinage in any way.
Yes and no. Only if you deface them for fraudulent purposes.


Is it illegal to damage or deface coins?​


Section 331 of Title 18 of the United States code provides criminal penalties for anyone who “fraudulently alters, defaces, mutilates impairs, diminishes, falsifies, scales, or lightens any of the coins coined at the Mints of the United States.” This statute means that you may be violating the law if you change the appearance of the coin and fraudulently represent it to be other than the altered coin that it is. As a matter of policy, the U.S. Mint does not promote coloring, plating or altering U.S. coinage: however, there are no sanctions against such activity absent fraudulent intent.
 

It Takes Eleven

Quoth the Raven...
Scholarship Club
One of the new places at the lake price show everything on the menu at round numbers but your tab is listed at odd numbers (like 4.16 instead of 4.50 for a craft beer or 12.85 for an entree) so your tab always comes to an even dollar or half dollar, and there's a listing for "hidden tax" on your check. I'm guessing they only have to keep quarters. More difficult for a convenience shore since they have many smaller items, but I really like the approach.

And I would've left everything on the counter and taken my money elsewhere.

RTR,

Tim
 

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