NEWS Former Duke star Wendell Carter's mother likens NCAA's rules to slavery during speech

#1

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- In an emotional address on Monday at a meeting of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics, Kylia Carter, mother of former Duke basketball star Wendell Carter, compared the current system of NCAA basketball to slavery and a prison system.

"When you remove all the bling and the bells and the sneakers and all that," she said, "you've paid for a child to come to your school to do what you wanted them to do for you, for free, and you made a lot of money when he did that, and you've got all these rules in place that say he cannot share in any of that. The only other time when labor does not get paid but yet someone else gets profits and the labor is black and the profit is white, is in slavery.

"To be honest with you," she said, "it's nauseating."

With her voice cracking at times, Carter humanized an otherwise agenda-filled morning that focused on reactions to the Rice Commission's recent report and the troubles that have plagued college basketball for decades, forcing the push for real reform following a highly publicized FBI investigation this past fall.

Donald Remy, the NCAA's chief legal officer, said the goal is to have the recommendations of the Rice Commission structured so they can be implemented by next basketball season, saying, "This is not the NCAA as usual," and "work has already begun." Carter's message, though, was that the societal and race-related problems that plague many athletes and their families run deeper than anything that could possibly be changed by August.

Carter, who played basketball at and graduated from Ole Miss, paused to collect herself and her thoughts as she told a crowded conference room filled with mainly white high-ranking university and NCAA officials about her grandmother and mother working on cotton fields in Mississippi.

"This would be even harder to say in the crowd, but I can say it here," she said in a hallway following the meeting. "It feels intentional. It feels like it was built this way intentionally. I can't move that from my thoughts.

"Should the NCAA be removed? Yes, because I don't trust it," she said. "You're not to be trusted because your intentions are clear. Let's call this group in the middle, let's call it something else. Let's put some real reform in there and call it something different and get rid of the current status quo because it's based on indentured servitude."

Carol Cartwright, president emeritus of Kent State and Bowling Green and a co-chair for the Knight Commission, said Carter "had a very strong point of view."

"We appreciate that," Cartwright said. "We provided a forum for her to express it. We have had similar personal and passionate point of views that have been expressed before."

Carter, whose son Wendell declared for the draft on his 19th birthday and is expected to be a high pick in the NBA draft, said there isn't enough support in place for most student-athletes to make the transition from college to the pros.

"You tell me it's about education, and we're giving you this fabulous education for your son to come to school here, so you're paying him with the education for his talent," she said. "If that's what you're paying him -- you're paying him with education -- why aren't you making sure he gets it? Why aren't you assigning somebody to him so if he is a one-and-done, why didn't you automatically assign him an academic advisor so that when he leaves he's got someone in his ear talking to him about the value of that education he left behind? Wendell doesn't have that problem because I'm going to be there like a jackhammer, but all of the other kids, the thing you pay them to come to your school and do, most of them don't ever get it."

Carter said paying the players won't solve the problem.

"If you pay the players and kept the system like it is, it would still destroy them -- it would just destroy them faster," she said. "That's not the solution. Don't get me wrong, it helps, but not without educating them on this process.

"The part that baffles me ... when you leave high school and prepare for college, and then going onto the pros, that whole process is not written down anywhere."
 

TUSKtimes

Riding The Wave
#3
Some of it I get, some of it is just having it your own way. Being African-American doesn't make the "slavery" comparison any less a poor choice of words. Would be nice if life came with a manual that just fit everyone regardless of a person's aptitude and life's experience. Not a kid in school that gets one of those manuals by the way. Mom admitted that she was in the player's ear about the benefits of a good education yet he can't wait to go to the NBA BEFORE year one is over. So what's the problem? Had the NBA allowed her son to go immediately to the draft after high school what would Mom have told junior?

This is still very much an NBA problem with these one and doners. Knowing that you have an NBA talented basketball player that is out of school before he is in, doesn't strike of tyranny and cruelty. Something by the way that was a common occurrence with "slavery."
 
#4
If slavery was voluntary.... ?
If you're a kid who grew up in squalor and went to bed hungry, who watched his momma struggle just to keep him alive .. who happens to have some talent at a big-money sport like football or basketball .. and coaches/recruiters/boosters/bag men/etc. start preying on you, throwing offers of cars, fancy shoes, women, and most importantly, MONEY for you and your family (maybe they'll help your mom get a real house, or pay for her dialysis, or help your sister get the physical therapy she needs) .. guilt tripping you into making adult decisions without much if any guidance, knowledge, and mentoring ("If you really loved your family, you'd pull the trigger on that LOI" or "Don't you want to be successful?" or "How else are you gonna get an education?") .. with pressure from friends, family, coaches, etc. coming at you from all directions .. and then big schools start throwing talk of the NFL/NBA and million dollar contracts at you .. I would think you'd be pretty hard-pressed to say 'no' in that situation. I don't believe it's truly voluntary in many cases.

Many of these kids are desperate. Folks will do a lot of damaging things out of desperation and without full knowledge of what they are signing up for.

The NCAA is a MAJOR problem (I could go off on them for days) but they are indicative of an even bigger problem: the indentured servitude that many of these kids unwittingly sign up for.
 

TUSKtimes

Riding The Wave
#5
If you're a kid who grew up in squalor and went to bed hungry, who watched his momma struggle just to keep him alive .. who happens to have some talent at a big-money sport like football or basketball .. and coaches/recruiters/boosters/bag men/etc. start preying on you, throwing offers of cars, fancy shoes, women, and most importantly, MONEY for you and your family (maybe they'll help your mom get a real house, or pay for her dialysis, or help your sister get the physical therapy she needs) .. guilt tripping you into making adult decisions without much if any guidance, knowledge, and mentoring ("If you really loved your family, you'd pull the trigger on that LOI" or "Don't you want to be successful?" or "How else are you gonna get an education?") .. with pressure from friends, family, coaches, etc. coming at you from all directions .. and then big schools start throwing talk of the NFL/NBA and million dollar contracts at you .. I would think you'd be pretty hard-pressed to say 'no' in that situation. I don't believe it's truly voluntary in many cases.

Many of these kids are desperate. Folks will do a lot of damaging things out of desperation and without full knowledge of what they are signing up for.

The NCAA is a MAJOR problem (I could go off on them for days) but they are indicative of an even bigger problem: the indentured servitude that many of these kids unwittingly sign up for.
Can you give me a short list of working folks that haven't been exploited in this manner? I assume you're speaking about the haves and have-nots? Doesn't make what you are saying about exploitation, regardless of the situation, any less dramatic, but the NCAA doesn't have anything on "the Gilded Age" and the "robber barons" that started it all in this country.
 
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#6
If slavery was voluntary.... ?
If you're a kid who grew up in squalor and went to bed hungry, who watched his momma struggle just to keep him alive .. who happens to have some talent at a big-money sport like football or basketball .. and coaches/recruiters/boosters/bag men/etc. start preying on you, throwing offers of cars, fancy shoes, women, and most importantly, MONEY for you and your family (maybe they'll help your mom get a real house, or pay for her dialysis, or help your sister get the physical therapy she needs) .. guilt tripping you into making adult decisions without much if any guidance, knowledge, and mentoring ("If you really loved your family, you'd pull the trigger on that LOI" or "Don't you want to be successful?" or "How else are you gonna get an education?") .. with pressure from friends, family, coaches, etc. coming at you from all directions .. and then big schools start throwing talk of the NFL/NBA and million dollar contracts at you .. I would think you'd be pretty hard-pressed to say 'no' in that situation. I don't believe it's truly voluntary in many cases.

Many of these kids are desperate. Folks will do a lot of damaging things out of desperation and without full knowledge of what they are signing up for.

The NCAA is a MAJOR problem (I could go off on them for days) but they are indicative of an even bigger problem: the indentured servitude that many of these kids unwittingly sign up for.
Philly... These kids can go straight out of HS into pro ball in Europe and make 6 figures, easy. Then come right back to the NBA. Signing up to be a slave isn't her poor baby's only option

Football is another subject. But still a choice...
 

BamaFan334

Verified Member
#7
If slavery was voluntary.... ?
If you're a kid who grew up in squalor and went to bed hungry, who watched his momma struggle just to keep him alive .. who happens to have some talent at a big-money sport like football or basketball .. and coaches/recruiters/boosters/bag men/etc. start preying on you, throwing offers of cars, fancy shoes, women, and most importantly, MONEY for you and your family (maybe they'll help your mom get a real house, or pay for her dialysis, or help your sister get the physical therapy she needs) .. guilt tripping you into making adult decisions without much if any guidance, knowledge, and mentoring ("If you really loved your family, you'd pull the trigger on that LOI" or "Don't you want to be successful?" or "How else are you gonna get an education?") .. with pressure from friends, family, coaches, etc. coming at you from all directions .. and then big schools start throwing talk of the NFL/NBA and million dollar contracts at you .. I would think you'd be pretty hard-pressed to say 'no' in that situation. I don't believe it's truly voluntary in many cases.

Many of these kids are desperate. Folks will do a lot of damaging things out of desperation and without full knowledge of what they are signing up for.

The NCAA is a MAJOR problem (I could go off on them for days) but they are indicative of an even bigger problem: the indentured servitude that many of these kids unwittingly sign up for.
But that starts with the environment his parents put him in. I don't feel like it's the NCAA, agents, or NBA's fault he was hungry to sign a letter of intent in efforts of making millions. It's not their fault she picked the life she led and raised her kids in it. It's all about decisions, and some folks make good one and some folks make bad ones. Slavery was an awful comparison. Would I be afforded that same response being a white guy and likening student loans to slavery because they are about as iron clad as it gets with no charge offs? I made decisions at seventeen, eighteen, and nineteen years old to take out those loans and just signing instead of reading and understanding how the hell interest loan paybacks worked. I feel zero sympathy for any of these idiotic parents that want to continue to blame others for their mistakes. The only ones I feel for are the children being raised in these shitty environments and raised to think on the same level that all you have to do is blame someone else for the decisions you personally make.
 
#8
I'm sorry, but the American Dream is the pursuit of happiness. Not a guarantee.

Are people making millions off these athletes....you better believe it. However, the athlete is given the opportunity at something he would not otherwise be able to obtain. On average it costs 60k a year to go to Duke. That's a quarter of a million dollar education. This is something the kid can use and have clout with for the rest of his life.

I have shared the story of some Reps I used to work with that were tackling dummies on the 92 squad. Those guys got a ring like everybody else and had business degrees, however they work in the healthcare field. They have very good 6 figure salaries and literally have made millions of dollars in their professional life, because of having played at Bama.

They had a choice and they made the best of it. This day and age everyone wants to be a victim of society or their environment or upbringing. Everyone has a choice, they can be a victim or a victor. John Wooten called it the 6 W's.
Work Will Win When Wishing Wont.
 

sk33tr

el jefe
HARRY'S
#9
so it's only slavery when the slave is black and the master is white? it can't be slavery if the slave is white and the master is black? or any combination of the two?

this woman is delusional if she thinks that's the only way it works.

and any and all credibility was lost when she decided to say something in a hallway instead in front of the very people she was complaining about. if you don't have the balls to say something directly to the people/person about whom you're speaking, then you have no business saying it. either tell them directly, or say nothing.
 
#10
I'm sorry, but the American Dream is the pursuit of happiness. Not a guarantee.

Are people making millions off these athletes....you better believe it. However, the athlete is given the opportunity at something he would not otherwise be able to obtain. On average it costs 60k a year to go to Duke. That's a quarter of a million dollar education. This is something the kid can use and have clout with for the rest of his life.

I have shared the story of some Reps I used to work with that were tackling dummies on the 92 squad. Those guys got a ring like everybody else and had business degrees, however they work in the healthcare field. They have very good 6 figure salaries and literally have made millions of dollars in their professional life, because of having played at Bama.

They had a choice and they made the best of it. This day and age everyone wants to be a victim of society or their environment or upbringing. Everyone has a choice, they can be a victim or a victor. John Wooten called it the 6 W's.
Work Will Win When Wishing Wont.
You make a good point. Too many are focused on a career in professional athletics. If it doesn't work out, for whatever reason (injury, just not good enough), they don't take advantage of their degree or they're too wrapped up watching their friends doing what might have been. The last I checked the minimum salary for an NFL player was ~$250k. The NBA is higher. When it doesn't work out and they have to take a $50-$75k job and work their way up (still in their 20s), they think they've failed. Somebody needs to give them a reality check.
 

ElephantStomp

Verified Member
#11
Maybe I’m mentally and emotionally wore out, but this is ignorant. People can go pro if they so choose, nobody forces them to stay in school.

The NCAA has obvious issues, but to say its slavery? I think the people that were actually slaves would beg to differ that people today are suffering even remotely.